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Signs of coming changes to our world

Signs of coming changes to our world

By Thohahoken On Friday February 24, 2017, the temperature will be 19 C. “All my intuitions are saying this is not right,” one grandmother writes. “I know many are happy for this warm weather but there will be serious consequences.” Another woman describes the consequences when the “blossoms come out on the trees too soon

By Thohahoken

On Friday February 24, 2017, the temperature will be 19 C.

“All my intuitions are saying this is not right,” one grandmother writes. “I know many are happy for this warm weather but there will be serious consequences.”

Another woman describes the consequences when the “blossoms come out on the trees too soon and then it gets cold and freezes again. That affects the fruit.” There isn’t any. And another mother says she’s seen the weather’s “been slowly changing for the past five years — we’re in the process of the big change.”

“I feel that the same way,” says another woman. “That this weather is a sign. Has been for some time.”

Alarm among our Rotinohsyonni mothers isn’t surprising. The social, environmental, meteorological, and astronomical trends we’ve seen throughout the past 20 years have been forecast in our teachings. It’s no surprise what we’re seeing in our world earthquakes, storms, and changing weather patterns. Elders like the late-Jake Thomas and late-Jake Swamp said this time in our history is called Kakaratsikowa — the Great Swamp Elm. At the time of Kakaratsikowa we’re told to heed what the women see.

In the teachings of the Rotinohsyonni in our Great Law (Kayaneresherakowa) the future generations were warned about turmoil. The warnings were simple. There would come a time when the people live in disarray and face certain extinction. The leaders would be “throwing ashes on each other” with their “heads rolling in the road”. The confusion of the leadership and the loss of hope by the People would push the Real Human Beings to the brink of disaster.

At this time the People rekindle their fire at the roots of a Great Elm (okaratsikowa). The People recover the ancestor’s ancient knowledge about how to live without electricity and gas, rise again, and take their rightful place in the world — the era in Rotinohsyonni development becomes Kakaratsikowa. However, this rebirth would be followed by changes to the world that humans can’t control — weather, earthquakes, and what happens in space. These teachings are known to others we well.

Indigenous writer Pam Colorado depicts how the Mayan pyramid at Chitchen Itza is actually a calendar. Indigenous People who were born around 1960 began to network for political, economic, social, and environmental purposes. This reawakening was predicted by the Maya and encoded in the 468 steps on the pyramid at Chitchen Itza (468 + 1492 = 1960). Also, the Mayan pyramid clearly shows a serpent descending to the earth that corresponds with the reawakening around the year 1960.

At the Indigenous Environment Network (IEN) conference at Stroud, Oklahoma in 1993 the Sac and Fox said a fiery serpent descends from the sky with 500 miles per hour winds and strikes the earth. In 1995 a Cree elder from Alberta, Canada said they saw a fiery serpent carrying 1,000 miles per hour winds splitting the mountains. Similar to our people, these references point to the Sun.

In the east the Rotinohsyonni say “the big man gives the earth a kick”. The ‘big man’ is the Sun. This event follows an era when violent thunderstorms arrive from the east instead of the west. Recently, many of our people noticed that annual hurricanes were moving farther up north on the east coast. In 2007 a weak hurricane reached Nova Scotia, Canada. In the summer of 2009 thunderstorms came from the east.

In July 2009 the Inuit convened a convention at Sirmiq Aattuq in Greenland to “bring the Sacred Fire home to the top of the World.” The Inuit Old Ones projected a return of what they characterize as their Sacred Fire. The Inuit said they survived in a stark and seemingly bereft land over thousands of years because the Sacred Fire departed and they were left without wood for their heat. However, the returning Sacred Fire means the return of firewood.

In August 2008 Maclean’s magazine reports that a James Bay Cree seer describes the calamitous return of water to engulf James Bay coastal communities. The article also describes doubts and ridicule aimed at the medicine man, but the article makes clear the regard given by the Cree to the water. Elders among the James Bay Cree talk about their Old Ones who said “water will be everywhere and many people will perish.” There will be an upheaval to a shifting Earth.

To summarize. At a meeting at the headwaters of the Mississippi in the 1480s the Maya said they built a nine-terraced pyramid at Chitchen Itza that forecasts the return of a Sky Serpent that will strike the earth. Rotinohnsyonni say the big man comes from the East and kicks the earth. People in the northwest say a fiery serpent descends from the sky and carries 1,000 miles per hour winds. In the southwest those People say the fiery serpent brings 500 miles per hour winds. There will be great changes on the earth, but once the violence has ended peace shall return to the earth.

What preparations are we making? Who carries knowledge for survival? What Indigenous knowledge will we need to survive any catastrophe? What happens when the current civilization descends into chaos? Did we learn anything since 1492 about defending ourselves? How do people live without electricity and gasoline?

We should be encouraged to hold discussions. Emergency preparations that face a severe calamity could be the focus of the discussion. However, the less drastic but most important measure should provide a lot of the discussion — food supply. Simple things like digging wells also has a place in the discussion. And in the process the people gather by the roots of the Great Swamp Elm (Kakaratsikowa) and take their place in the world.

The future? No cellular-phones. No TV. No cars. No money. If nothing happens at least we regained the knowledge of our ancestors about eating, healing, and shelter. We learned to be Onkwehonwe again. We have nothing to lose.

Heed what one woman said when talking about this week’s weather. “Our mother (earth) is going to go through some major changes and so will we.”

 

(Thohahoken Michael Doxtater is an educator from Six Nations.)

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