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Missing Eagle on wild adventure across Ontario

Huxah, the name of this mischievous creature, is a 20 year old rescued bird owned by a falconer in the Simcoe area. He has been reported missing for about two weeks and has reportedly been on an adventure of sorts, showing up in photos across the Facebook feeds of people from all across Southern Ontario; once caught stealing fish from ice fisherman at Deer Point Lake and snacking on grey squirrels near Vittoria.

Last weekend a bald eagle literally stopped traffic in the village of Ohsweken last week. The eagle landed in the middle of Fourth Line in front of Village Cafe and the Ohsweken Baptist Church to snack on a grey squirrel.

Huxah, the name of this mischievous creature, is a 20 year old rescued bird owned by a falconer in the Simcoe area. He has been reported missing for about two weeks and has reportedly been on an adventure of sorts, showing up in photos across the Facebook feeds of people from all across Southern Ontario; once caught stealing fish from ice fisherman at Deer Point Lake and snacking on grey squirrels near Vittoria.

Huxah was rescued from a forest fire by the Cree Nation of Manitoba when he was just an eaglet. When the forest was ablaze members of that nation saw Huxah’s parents flee. In an attempt to preserve his life some members climbed to his nest, rescued him and raised him. As a result Huxah, which means ‘little boy’ in Cree, was imprinted on humans. When Huxah grew larger than the Cree Nation could handle he was transferred into the care of Ulrich Waterman, a falconer with experience caring for rescued birds.

Because Huxah was imprinted on humans he identifies his ‘person’ as his mate. A few weeks ago Waterman suffered a stroke. His daughter, Rita Waterman, believes this caused Huxah anxiety. It is mating season, so it is her belief that Huxah has literally ‘flown the coop’ to search for his ‘mate’.

Waterman’s daughter has been following tips on Huxah’s whereabouts. Although the bird is tame she advises that it is not safe to try to call him in without experience as his talons are razor sharp. Huxah is wearing leather anklets and jusses, standard wear for an eagle in care.

If you see Huxah, please feel free to share your pictures with us on our Facebook page and share this story widely in hopes we can help locate this beloved eagle and help him get home. If found you can contact us via email info@tworowtimes.com or leave a message on our Facebook page and we’ll forward it along to his family.

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Nahnda Garlow

Nahnda Garlow

Nahnda Garlow is Onondaga under the wing of the Beaver Clan of Six Nations. Nahnda has been a journalist with the Two Row Times since it's founding in 2013. She is a self-proclaimed "rez girl" who brings to the Two Row Times years of experience as a Haudenosaunee cultural interpreter, traditional dancer and beadwork aficionado. Nahnda is a member of the Canadian Association of Journalists and the Native American Journalists Association.

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10 Comments

  • amanda
    March 24, 2014, 10:10 am

    A friend saw him Saturday outside of Boston, Ont sitting on guard rails on a bend on Cockshutt Rd.

    REPLY
  • Diane
    March 23, 2014, 1:31 pm

    Huxah was fishing with my son in law, ate the fish in the bucket and then Huxah ate what ever they caught. The bird seemed very hungry and came inches from our son in law for food. Huxah did not fly away from fear nor did he attack anyone around him. Having to take this bird and allow him to survive without human assistance will kill him. He has been cuddled and pampered to much in order for him to be free to fly. I feel he has to be returned to his owners to survive as their are to many cruel people that will love to have him for dinner. Bring Huxah back to his home and a number should be posted for people to call when they have him is site.

    REPLY
  • disqus_tObYqppPWg
    March 20, 2014, 10:08 pm

    Huxah is a beloved pet, much like the family dog. He is not “free”, he is lost. He is “tame”, and could be harmed, if caught by the wrong person.

    REPLY
    • Spencerforhire@disqus_tObYqppPWg
      March 22, 2014, 1:01 pm

      “Tame” pet “snack on a grey squirrel” LOL!!!

      REPLY
      • disqus_tObYqppPWg@Spencerforhire
        March 22, 2014, 1:14 pm

        Are you serious Spency….my cat has brought home a squirrel, and hunting dogs will often bring home small game from the bush. These are indeed pets. What planet are you from? Do you know anything???

        REPLY
        • Spencerforhire@disqus_tObYqppPWg
          March 22, 2014, 1:38 pm

          Yep Domestic animals are 1,060 times more deadly than turbines.

          Most research shows that these particular birds are more at risk from
          mining than wind turbines. In fact, communication towers are 50 times
          more deadly to birds than turbines, pesticides 710 times, vehicles 860
          times, cats 1,060 times, high-tension lines 1,370 times, and buildings
          and windows are a whopping 5,890 times more deadly to birds. According
          to http://www.flap.org, “it is estimated that more than 10,000 migratory birds
          are killed , a year, by bright windows.

          disqus_tObYqppPWg is Dalton McGuinty

          REPLY
      • disqus_tObYqppPWg@Spencerforhire
        March 22, 2014, 1:16 pm

        The only eagles you like, are the ones you pick up from the bottoms of wind turbines. You are such a loser Spency.

        REPLY
  • Donna Skye
    March 20, 2014, 11:20 am

    Hey Huxah, seems to being doing find.. Let him be free!! And for all the people let him be dont bother him. Let him live a free life like he is suppose to be.. He knows how to hunt,so he is could to go…..

    REPLY
  • windy3Nimby
    March 20, 2014, 12:15 am

    Huxah come home please.

    REPLY
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