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Salad in a jar

Salad in a jar

This time of the season you can still make great tasting, locally grown food. When stored properly, the vast availability of close to home grown produce will amaze you. Eating what is available from the area in which you live and with the season is one way to connect with the land. It is also

This time of the season you can still make great tasting, locally grown food. When stored properly, the vast availability of close to home grown produce will amaze you. Eating what is available from the area in which you live and with the season is one way to connect with the land. It is also a great way to support a local food system.

The majority of the dollars you spend on vegetables that have travelled far goes to the middleman or distributors. The farther your food travels, the farther you are removed from supporting the people that grow your food. Every small step taken to bridge the gap from the field to the table brings us all closer to a nutritionally rooted food system.

Eating food that grows closer to home also tastes better than those that have been imported. Even in early January you can find nutritious vegetables to make a raw and refreshing salad. They are a great accompaniment to a stick to your bones winter meal offering balance to rich flavours and contrasting textures in your mouth.

Salads made with hearty vegetables – not tender greens – keep well for long periods of time and are a great choice to make ahead of time. When put in a jar, a layered winter vegetable salad is a great portable light meal or snack. Also, using colourful vegetables and interesting ways to cut them can make the salad nice to look at.

Salad in a Jar

equal parts:
Beets – peeled and cut in Matchsticks
Carrot – peeled and cut in Matchsticks
Cabbage – shredded
Apple – cut in small cubes

to your preference:

Toasted Sunflower Seeds
Fresh Mint – Torn

Layer each ingredient in a jar in the following order:

  •  apples
  •  dressing, make sure to cover the apples so they do not oxidize
  •  mint evenly distributed after each layer
  •  beets
  •  cabbage
  •  carrots
  •  sunflower seeds

shake to mix before serving, pour out into a bowl and enjoy!

variation: try adding 0.25 part – sprouted beans to the mix

Mint Apple Cider Vinaigrette

1 part apple cider vinegar
2 parts vegetable oil
1 tsp per part dijon mustard
2 tsp per part maple syrup

to taste:
salt
pepper
fresh mint

Whisk all ingredients together. Taste and adjust seasoning as you wish.

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