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The real treasure of Oak Island

The real treasure of Oak Island

NOVA SCOTIA — Oak Island, located just off the coast of Nova Scotia, has not given up its legendary treasure of vast amounts of templar gold, historical items from the holy land or even the lost manuscripts of Charles Bacon, thought by some to be the actual writer of most of William Shakespeare’s famous plays.

NOVA SCOTIA — Oak Island, located just off the coast of Nova Scotia, has not given up its legendary treasure of vast amounts of templar gold, historical items from the holy land or even the lost manuscripts of Charles Bacon, thought by some to be the actual writer of most of William Shakespeare’s famous plays.

The TV reality series “The Curse of Oak Island” has become the most-watched show of its kind on cable television today after completing its seventh season and 111th episode.

What the Lagina Brothers, Marty, and Rick, who head up the televised search have found along the way is not disappointing, in a historical sense. Enough artifacts have been found to promising yet another season of searching after having to shut down for the season due to weather.

The most important finds so far are not so much the old picks and mining gear from earlier treasure hunters and whoever hid it deep in the bowels of this small island, but rather the dates of these finds as affirmed by the University of Halifax and other recognized specialists.

Man-made artifacts found deep within the ground as well as strange markers carved in large rocks strategically placed around the island have been dated as far back as the 1100s. The finds are proving that what is now Canada’s east coast, was known by some European and Scandinavian explorers long before 1492.

That would also strongly suggest contact with the indigenous tribes of that area happened long before previously known. Other tantalizing finds made by the Lagina Brothers and the Oak Island research team dated to the early to mid-1700s. This period points to the building of an elaborate booby-trapped pit some 120 feet down.

The search for treasure began in 1795 when 18-year old Daniel McGinnis saw lights coming from the island. Curious, he and two their boys rowed to the island and discovered a large oak tree with a block and tackle on a branch leading to a freshly buried pit beneath. The search has been going on ever since with many treasure hunters spending years, decades, and all their money trying to find the elusive treasure, whatever that may be.

This most recent search is by far the most extensive, expensive, and elaborate attempt to solve the Oak Island mystery. Although not solid at this time, the series is expected to continue in the fall with season eight.

 

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Jim Windle

Jim Windle

Jim Windle is a veteran news and sports reporter who has been published in a number of mediums and publications. contact Jim: windlejim@rocketmail.com

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